Thursday, October 17, 2013

LE SUEUR COUNTY DHS DISCRIMINATES DISABILITY!

SUSAN RYNDA HEAD OF HUMAN SERVICE ALLOWS EMPLOYEES TO DISCRIMINATE SERVICES AGAINST PERSON WITH DISABILITY.

LE SUEUR COUNTY DISCRIMINATES AGAINST DISABILITY? OF ALL THE PLACES IN THE WORLD TO DISCRIMINATE AGAINST SOMEONE for having a disability. I SENT THIS TO ABOUT 50 NEWS STATIONS  BIG AND SMALL. THIS IS CRAZY. SOCIAL WORKERS EXPLOITING, ABUSING, AND DISCRIMINATING SOMEONE WHO WAS TORTURED MOST OF HER LIFE. So they can supply children to the county attorney's childless family members.  

MOTHER HAS C-PTSD SHE IS KICKED OUT OF HALFWAY HOUSE FOR EMOTIONAL DISREGULATION
SHE IS KICKED OUT- OF OUT PATIENT FOR TREATING PHYSICAL HEALTH, ANOTHER PROBLEM ASSOCIATED TO CPTSD IS POOR PHYSICAL HEALTH. These symptoms would be more prevalent during times of extreme duress. Say for example your children were abducted and placed in foster care illegally. The county attorneys used laws that did not define the events because according to Minnesota law there was no maltreatment just county officials breaking laws. 


WE ALL KNOW THE SAME CHILD PROTECTION WORKERS FORCED A TEEN IN THEIR CARE TO TRY AND TAKE THEIR OWN LIFE THAT IS HOW DANGEROUS THESE PEOPLE ARE!!!!

WHEN UNDER EXTREME DURESS FOR EXAMPLE A SEVERELY EMOTIONALLY ABUSIVE SOCIAL WORKER LIKE SALLY SCHROER AND CARI KRENIK  RE-PARENTING HER CHILDREN ALONG WITH JUDGE MICHAEL BAXTER 
FOUNTAIN CENTER IN PATIENT TELLS SCHROER MOTHER NEEDS SUPERVISED PROGRAM WITH MOTHER AND CHILDREN TOGETHER 

SCHROER SAID NO ONLY TERMINATION TO FOUNTAIN CENTERS RECOMMENDATION DENYING MOTHER A SECOND PROGRAM THAT SHE NEEDED TO REUNITE CHILDREN AND PARENTING SKILLS SO MOTHER IS MOVED TO NORTHFIELD WHEN CHILDREN ARE DENIED. SHE ENDS UP GETTING THE BOOT BECAUSE THE PROGRAM IS NOT CAPABLE OF DEALING WITH SOMEONE WHO HAS CPTSD 

THESE TYPES OF PROGRAMS LOWELL FREEMAN SAID ARE NEVER DENIED CHILDREN ALWAYS GO 




OCR is responsible for enforcing Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Section 504); Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Section 508); Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990; and Section 1557 of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) as they apply to entities under the jurisdiction of OCR.


  • OCR's jurisdiction under Section 504 includes programs and activities that receive Federal financial assistance from HHS, and programs and activities conducted by HHS.
  • OCR's enforcement authority under Section 508 covers access to electronic and information technology provided by HHS.
  • OCR's jurisdiction under ADA covers all of the health care and social services programs and activities of public entities (state and local governments, departments, agencies, etc.).
  • OCR has enforcement authority under Section 1557 of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (42 U.S.C. 18116), which provides that an individual shall not be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination on the grounds prohibited under Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 42 U.S.C. 2000d et seq. (race, color, national origin), Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, 20 U.S.C. 1681 et seq. (sex), the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, 42 U.S.C. 6101 et seq. (age), or Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, 29 U.S.C. 794 (disability), under any health program or activity, any part of which is receiving federal financial assistance, or under any program or activity that is administered by an Executive Agency or any entity established under Title I of the Affordable Care Act or its amendments.  OCR has enforcement authority with respect to health programs and activities that receive Federal financial assistance from the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) or are administered by HHS or any entity established under Title I of the Affordable Care Act or its amendments.
Cari Krenik and Sally Schroer you have been found guilty 

Rights and Responsibilities under Section 504 and the ADA


Section 504 and the ADA protect qualified individuals with disabilities from discrimination on the basis of disability in the provision of benefits and services.  See the Facts Sheets and the Regulations for an explanation of who is a qualified individual with a disability and more detailed information about rights and responsibilities.

Covered entities must not, on the basis of disability:

  • Exclude a person with a disability from a program or activity;
  • Deny a person with a disability the benefits of a program or activity;
  • Afford a person with a disability an opportunity to participate in or benefit from a benefit or service that is not equal to what is afforded others;
  • Provide a benefit or service to a person with a disability that is not as effective as what is provided others;
  • Provide different or separate benefits or services to a person with a disability unless  necessary to provide benefits or services that are as effective as what is provided others;
  • Apply eligibility criteria that tend to screen out persons with disabilities unless necessary for the provision of the service, program or activity.

Covered entities must:

  • Provide services and programs in the most integrated setting appropriate to the needs of the qualified individual with a disability;
  • Ensure that programs, services, activities, and facilities are accessible; To learn more>>
  • Make reasonable modifications in their policies, practices, and procedures to avoid discrimination on the basis of disability, unless it would result in a fundamental alteration of the program;
  • Provide auxiliary aids to persons with disabilities, at no additional cost, where necessary to afford an equal opportunity to participate in or benefit from a program or activity;
  • Designate a responsible employee to coordinate their efforts to comply with Section 504 and the ADA;
  • Adopt grievance procedures to handle complaints of disability discrimination in their programs and activities;
  • Provide notice that indicates:
    • That the covered entity does not discriminate on the basis of disability;
    • How to contact the employee who coordinates the covered entity’s efforts to comply with the law; and
    • Information about the grievance procedures.
WHO DO I REPORT ABUSE TO BECAUSE HEAD OF HUMAN SERVICE SUSAN RYNDA HAD ASSISTANT COUNTY ATTORNEY MEGAN GAUDETTE BLOCKED SOMEONE WHO RECOGNIZED SALLY SCHROER DISCRIMINATING ABUSING AND EXPLOITING SOMEONE WITH A DISABILITY
  • SALLIE SCHROER AND CARI KRENIK 
  • #1 SIGNS THAT SOMEONE MAY BE AN ABUSER 
  • Refusal to follow directions or complete necessary personal tasks
  • SALLY SCHROER- NO CALL NO SHOW FOR MEETING AT FOUNTAIN CENTERS
  • CARI KRENIK- INSISTS DESPITE OVERWHELMING EVIDENCE MOTHER WAS TREATED UNFAIRLY REPEATEDLY AND HAS CPTSD REFUSED TO WORK WITH HER QAND INSISTED TERMINATION
  • Displaying controlling attitudes and behaviors
  • Showing up late or not at all
  • Using threats or menacing looks/body language as a form of intimidation
  • Impulsive
  • SALLY SCHROER - THREATENED CHILDREN MULTIPLE TIMES TO CONTROL GENIE AND FAMILY
  • CARI KRENIK ALSO THREATENED CHILDREN TO CONTROL

  • Using vehicle, money or other resources without consent
  • SALLY SCHROER CUTS HOUSING
  • CARI KRENIK CANELLS RIDE TO LAST VISIT CAUSING MOTHER TO LOSE OVER AN HOUR OF TWO HOURS CARI KNOWS A MONTH EARLY IT IS LAST VISIT MOM AND KIDS DO NOT

  • Socially isolating person with a disability (including limiting educational and/or employment opportunities)
  • LETTERS FROM HEAD OF HUMAN SERVICE SUSAN RYNDA AND MEGAN GAUDETTE TO KEEP GENIE ISOLATED ALL DHS IS TOLD TO HAVE NO CONTACT WITH FAMILY ONLY GENIE ONLY ALONE
CARI KRENIK IS RECORDED TELLING ANITA BRACKEN SHE REFUSES TO SPEAK WITH HER AND DENIES MOTHER AND ANITA TO PRESENT OPTION SENDS LETTER TO ANITA THAT SHE WILL BE REQUIRED TO HIRE LAWYER IS SHE DOES NOT WANT HER TO EXPLOIT GENIES RIGHTS

  • Devalues the person with developmental disabilities
  • SALLY SCHROER LOOK AT YOU LOOK WHERE YOU ARE I AM MORE A MOTHER THAN YOU ARE TO YOUR KIDS 
  • Frequently switches health care providers
  • SALLY SCHROER SWITCHED THEN CUT HEALTH CARE
  • Competes with the person with developmental disabilities
SALLY SCHROER COMPETES WITH MOTHER OVER RIGHT AND WRONG IN LETTER TO JUDGE ABOUT CHILD GETTING HIS LIP BUSTED OPEN
SALLY SCHROER CARI KRENIK SUSAN RYNDA MEGAN GAUDETTE SHARI SOLHEIM ONLY WANT TO WORK WITH MOM ALONE

Types of Emotional Abuse and Neglect

Emotional abuse is the most difficult form of abuse to identify. Even though emotional abuse often happens along with other forms of abuse, it can also occur by itself.
Caregivers who have power and influence over others' lives can use that power to harm or exploit, rather than to support and nurture. This can be especially devastating for children in their developmental years, but it can be harmful for anyone.
Emotional abuse can take the form of threats, insults harassment, and less noticeable forms that are difficult to detect. These can be perpetrated by individuals or by representatives of caregiving systems. Here are some of the most common types of emotional abuse and neglect:
  • SALLY SCHROER AND CARI KRENIK ARE GUILTY OF 
  • Insults and harassment
  • Denial of conditions necessary for physical and emotional well-being
  • Denial of communication
  • Denial of right to family life
  • Denial of social interaction and inclusion
  • Denial of economic stability
  • Denial of rights, necessities, privileges, and opportunities
  • Denial of ordinary freedoms

Behavioral Signs of Abuse

Behavioral signs can be extremely important in detecting abuse and neglect, especially in people who have communication challenges and are unable to tell anyone about what happened to them. In many cases, physical signs of abuse may not yet be present or noticed so behavioral signs are often the first indicators. Usually it is a combination of physical and behavioral changes that are seen in people that have been abused.� Here are some of the behavioral signs of possible abuse:
Aggressive behavior
  • Is widespread among victims of abuse
  • May imitate the aggression committed against the abused person (e.g., the child who is whipped may whip smaller children)
  • May generalize to other forms of aggression, such as yelling or hitting others
  • May be exhibited through excessively violent drawings, stories, or play

Disclosure
  • Direct disclosures of abuse, neglect, or exploitation are powerful evidence, even when some details are incorrect.
  • Complaining of soreness or pain when unrelated to disability or illness.
  • All disclosures should be given attention and referred to the appropriate authorities for full evaluation.
Fearfulness
Victims of abuse often appear fearful of others:
  • Fear can be specific to the abuser, but may generalize to other people or places
  • Fear may be age or gender-specific (e.g., the child who turns away and raises his or her arms as if to ward off a blow whenever an adult nearby makes a sudden move)
  • The person may be afraid to go home, or afraid to leave home
  • The child may be afraid to change clothes for gym activities (may be attempting to hide injuries, bruises), or may be afraid to take off a long-sleeved shirt even in the heat
Learning Disabilities
Difficulty learning can be a result of abuse for complex reasons. Much of the child's energy is directed toward surviving the abuse and coping with stress. This leaves little energy for learning or other typical childhood activities.
Psychotherapy, or other appropriate treatments, can lead to improvement for those whose learning disabilities resulted from their psychological response to abuse.
Noncompliance
People who are abused often become noncompliant. Noncompliance:
  • May be a generalized response to frustration, or an effort to gain personal control
  • May be aimed at avoidance of the abuser or the abusive situation
  • Can take the form of chronically running away (adolescents)
Regression
Often children who are abused behave like younger children. This form of regression:
  • May reflect their inability to move through normal stages of development in the face of intense anxiety
  • Could reflect a mechanism of escape
  • Can be limited to affective and interpersonal behavior
  • Can extend to developmental skills such as toileting (e.g., a child who was previously toilet trained may begin to have accidents after experiencing abuse)
Sleepdisturbance
  • Having nightmares or trouble getting to sleep are characteristic of abused persons
  • This can lead to further abuse due to caregiver frustration and loss of sleep
Withdrawal
  • People who are abused often withdraw from others and spend much of their time alone
  • Sometimes the withdrawal is related to depression
  • Sometimes the person will alternate between withdrawal and aggression
  • Aggression may be the person's way of discouraging interaction with others. For example, an abused child may keep to himself and avoid other children, but become aggressive when unable to avoid interaction4.

Signs and Symptoms of Exploitation

Taking advantage of individuals with a developmental disability can rob them of their independence and the ability to afford the basic necessities of life, such as food, rent payments and medicine. It's also a crime and should be reported right away to the Florida Abuse Hotline.
In particular, financial exploitation often goes unreported or is reported long after the damage is done. When that happens, the suspect is far more likely to get away with the crime and move on to other victims. Here are a few signs to watch for:

  • Sudden decrease in bank account balances


  • Sudden change in banking practices (such as making several large withdrawals from a bank account or ATM over a period of several days instead of one small withdrawal each week)


  • Sudden problems paying bills or buying food or other necessities


  • Sudden changes in wills or other financial documents


  • The person begins to act very secretively. (Telephone con artists often try to isolate their victims to avoid detection by telling the victim not to let anybody know about their calls.)


  • Unexplained disappearance of money or valuable possessions


  • Substandard care being provided or bills which are late or unpaid despite the availability of adequate financial resources


  • Concerns expressed by a person with a developmental disability that he or she is being exploited


  • Lack of money early in the month (when disability or other types of government benefits are paid)
If you notice any of these signs or suspect that a person with a developmental disability might be a victim of exploitation, please contact SOMEONE

Many people with developmental disabilities have grown accustomed to being treated without respect, and are used to routine treatment that most other people would not tolerate. People with developmental disabilities may view only the most severe acts against them to be worthy of attention and possible reporting. The victim may consider an incident "unimportant" unless it involves serious physical harm.

Fear of not having needs met
People with developmental disabilities who are dependent on others for their day-to-day care may be fearful that if they let anyone know they are being mistreated, they will no longer receive the care they need. They may also fear reprisals from their caregivers if they tell anyone.
Communication challenges
Some people with developmental disabilities are limited in their ability to communicate verbally about an abusive incident. Adaptations may be required to insure adequate communications. Behavioral and circumstantial indicators become more important in identifying abuse, neglect, and exploitation in these cases.

Signs of abuse may be interpreted as behavioral problems
The best rule of thumb for recognizing the behavioral signs of abuse, neglect, or exploitation is to know what is normal behavior for the particular person. When assessing the person's behavior, it is important to take the following steps: